Oakland Bulk & Oversized Terminal 2013: City Touted Jobs, No Coal Fears




(Last Updated On: February 5, 2019)

The Bulk & Oversized Terminal is a project under development and also the focus of much misunderstanding (its not a coal plant) and legal controversy (it’s not a coal terminal). But, in 2013, it was the “ Global” Army Base Reuse Project, the darling of elected officials when it was introduced.

At the Global groundbreaking, the talk was not about coal, but how the terminal facility would provide jobs for . As you will learn, that the facility would handle many commodities, including coal, was known, even then. But jobs were a central point of then Mayor Jean Quan’s statement to Zennie62Media at the Global groundbreaking, as one can see and hear, here:

And prior to the Global Groundbreaking, and in 2012, then Economic Development Director Fred Blackwell gave Zennie62Media this project update:

The Story of Global and Bulk & Oversized Terminal

This is a summary of the story of how Global and the Bulk & Oversized Terminal were born as a project in 2013 (Author note: was a member of the 1992-1993 Alameda Base Reuse Committee that served to provide community input on the decommissioned Army Base, and crafted the objective of the replacement of the low-skilled, well-paying jobs the Army Base provided. That objective has still not been met by the City of , and its 2019.)

The Federal Government decommissioned the Oakland Army Base in 1999. After a decade and a half of strategic planning, the Oakland Army Base was approved to become a rail-served logistics center, which will include a multi-commodity bulk terminal, state-of-the-art warehouses and rail yards.

This new, world-class facility will be known as the Trade and Logistics Center, or “.” is the result of eight years of collaboration amongthe City of Oakland, the Port of Oakland and California Capital & Investment Group (CCIG).

Two primary features of are the (OBOT), which is a multi-commodity, bulk marine terminal, and the Railroad Enterprise (OGRE). OBOT and OGRE are affiliates of CCIG.

The approval process for this project is one of the longest and most public in the history of the City of Oakland. 251 public meetings were held; the project addressed City Council more than 51 times; the project garnered 128 permits for infrastructure;and 76 permits are required for the marine terminal.

In April 2014, , the project developer, was part of a group that entered into an exclusive negotiating agreement and then a development agreement to develop and operate the .

Economic Impact Of : has established an unprecedented community benefits package, which stipulates that of at least half of construction hours and hires for ongoing operations be allocated for Oakland residents, with a hiring prioritization on West Oakland residents. Once fully built-out and operational, is projected to create 11,970 jobs,including up to $300 million annually in regional employment income*.

Commitment to Environmental Protection: commends and embraces California and Oakland’s commitment to lead by example and set extraordinary GHG emissions reduction mandates. The project’s operations will set the standard for compliance with those mandates. In addition to the 204 permits issued for the project, is subject to more than 660 mitigation mandates and conditions of approval by the City of Oakland and the Port of Oakland, including the establishment of a strict air quality regimen in compliance with regulations of BAAQMD.

At all times, operations and commodities processed at will be subject to and in compliance with federal, state, regional and local laws and regulations

Oakland Global has been monitoring air quality around the project since October 2013 and early results show air quality and emissions related to Port operations in and around the project will be improved under the project’s operating standards.

Commitment to Health and Safety: The health and safety of workers and neighbors in the Oakland community is the project’s number one priority. We emphasize health and safety in all aspects of the workplace and are designing practices and procedures using industry best practices and standards.

Shipment Commodities for the : To feasibly operate and meet established expectations of the multi-commodity, bulk-shipping market as well as be commercially viable, a terminal must have the ability and capacity to handle any of the more than 15,000 commodities legally shipped throughout the world.

Stay tuned.

About the Author

Zennie Abraham
Zennie Abraham is the CEO of Zennie62Media

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