Frank Robinson, A Man Of Oakland Dies Who Could Have Owned The A’s

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(Last Updated On: February 8, 2019)

Atlanta – When news of the death of , ever a Major League Baseball legend, came on the television yesterday, I was sitting at the kitchen table with my Mom, who’s the same age as he, 83. I’m here helping my Mom (and not been to my place in but 69 days of the past year), and everything that a son’s supposed to do – including talking.

Anyway, when Mom’s ears caught the news about , her first words, without hesitation, were, “He helped my friend go to college.”

See, before my Mom moved here to suburban Atlanta with her now passed on husband , Jr., they lived in . And my Mom and moved to on April 8th of 1974. So, we have been in a while, and if you’re black in our town, or had a good set of African American friends (common in the really-diverse ), and were alive about the same span of time as we, there’s a good chance you have a story.

Maybe you saw him at the grocery store, or a restaurant, or a bar, or at a friend’s place. Or maybe you went to during the late 70s (I am Skyline High class of 1980) and saw Robinson hanging out at Joe Morgan’s place (easy to do if you walked down Bacon Road, next to Skyline Boulevard, and went past the house with the black gate that had the giant “M” on it! I once stopped and saw Morgan beat the crap out of Reggie Jackson in tennis!)

Or maybe you went to school with Mr. Robinson. attended along with another local legend, . On Twitter, Mr. Russell, a star not just at McClymonds, but at the University of San Francisco, tweeted this:

And in my case, I remember when Robinson almost owned the A’s.

I was economic advisor to Mayor , who entrusted me with finding potential buyers for the A’s in 1996. Why? Because our lease with the team at the time placed such responsibility in the hands of the , so that went to the Mayor, who passed it to me as his aide.

I received a call from a man named , the Sacramento Kings Limited Partner at the time, who was interested in purchasing the team but specifically wanted Frank Robinson to be a co-owner with him. As it happened, I had reached out to Hollywood agent , and he connected me with a man named . Rosen was the agent for . I put them together, but for some strange reason, Keriotis failed to keep me in the loop.

Not surprisingly the whole deal fell apart. (What John failed to do was involve Mayor Harris in his quest – he was interested more in doing the deal himself, but no one knew who he was.)

For a time, it seemed just plain right: Frank Robinson, a hometown boy, loved by everyone, the first black manager in baseball, owning the . It still seems right, even now.

Frank Robinson, a man of , rest in peace.

About the Author

Zennie Abraham
Zennie Abraham is the CEO of Zennie62Media

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